Making our communities healthy for birds... and people

City of Alma

Community Achievements

Habitat Creation, Protection, and Monitoring

C. Provide evidence (e.g., official designation of natural areas, easements, etc.) that existing bird habitat within community limits has legal protection. (Exclusions: Leash laws; prohibitions against disturbing nests and wildlife; areas consisting primarily of mowed grass)

There is a long history of legal protection of the Alma, Wisconsin area at the State, National and International levels. Existing habitats include large tracts of floodplain forest, forested wetlands, bluffs, braided channels, open water, forested islands, riverine wetlands, and prairie along the Mississippi River. All land within City of Alma Parks & Trails is also protected.

CITY OF ALMA PARKS & HIKING TRAILS

The City sponsors four areas where birding activities and the creation and protection of habitat are managed. All of these parks and trails are actively managed by the City of Alma.

  • BUENA VISTA PARK, OVERLOOK & HIKING TRAIL: Buena Vista Park was presented to the City of Alma by the Ganz/McClyman family and has been actively managed by the City of Alma since the 1930s. In 1996 the McClyman family granted the City of Alma the right to use the trail referred to as Buena Vista Trail for the purposes of a pedestrian public hiking trail from spring through winter. It’s a fantastic winter hike by foot or snowshoe. The sunlit edges of Buena Vista Park with tall standing oaks provide a virtual buffet of insects for migrating warblers during spring migration. The City of Alma maintains Buena Vista’s 3-mile long hiking trail that winds from the City of Alma to the top of the bluff and Buena Vista Park. This trail is rough mowed from spring through fall. Known for viewing bald eagles, turkey vultures & peregrine falcons from the overlook. The hiking trail also offers great warbler viewing during spring migration. A natural spring hosts many bird populations, but is a favorite in the winter for cardinals. This park & trail are identified as an asset in the Buffalo County Outdoor Recreation Plan (2016-2020).
  • MOSSY HOLLOW TRAILS: Before farm animals were banned from the City of Alma, well after the turn of the century, residents used to pasture their horses and cattle in a sort of commons area called "Mossy Hollow". Today the hollow hosts three hiking trails, they have been actively managed by the City of Alma since 1997. The City of Alma maintains the hiking trails sometimes with the assistance of Dairyland Power. Portions of the trails are rough mowed from spring through fall. A haven for warblers, hikes are hosted along Mossy Hollow Trails in the spring. The Cerulean, Prothonotary and Hooded warblers complete their northern migration in Mossy Hollow and have established nesting sites. Winter hikers enjoy the views from the bluff overlooking the Mississippi River. The Peregrine Falcon nesting box on the Dairyland Power Plant smokestack can be viewed from the trail. Mossy Hollow Trailsand the surrounding acreage were designed for hiking/walking trails, nature study of song birds, and wildlife, tree & plant identification. It is available for other recreational and nature-oriented activities that are compatible with each other and with the natural area. In 1997, Dairyland Power Cooperative transferred this land to the City of Alma. The Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife & Fish Refuge assisted the City of Alma in planning this natural area in 2004. This area includes approximately 102 acres of land in the valley on the south end of the city and extends up 12-Mile Bluff. This trail is identified as an asset in the Buffalo County Outdoor Recreation Plan (2016-2020).
  • RIECK'S LAKE PARK, VIEWING AREA & CAMPGROUND: This park has been actively managed by the City of Alma since the early 1930s. The City of Alma actively management at Rieck’s Lake Park. Two observation decks for birders and 6 large interpretive panels were placed in 2006. The park is best known for Tundra Swans but hosts a variety of water birds, ducks & bald eagles. Campers frequent this park during spring and fall bird migration specifically to view birds, each campsite has direct viewing over Rieck’s Lake. For years this park has hosted the Tundra Swan Watch where 6,000+ tundra swans would “fall from the sky” during fall migration for a stopover rest and their favorite food source. This was an Alma town event providing a close-up view of migrating tundra swans and thousands of people came to Alma to see the swans. These numbers dwindled as the habitat in Rieck’s Lake has naturally filled with silt from the Buffalo River reducing the necessary water surface for tundra swans to land and take-off and reducing their favorite food source. In 2010 the City of Alma with the Wisconsin DNR financed the dredging of Rieck’s Lake to improve the habitat for tundra swans but to no avail. The lake again filled with silt. Today a few tundra swans continue to stopover at Rieck’s Lake during their spring and fall migrations but the majority of swans stopover now on nearby Big Lake (Mississippi River) in the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife & Fish Refuge. This park & trail are identified as an asset in the Buffalo County Outdoor Recreation Plan (2016-2020).
  • ALMA CITY MARINA & RECREATION COMPLEX: This park has been actively managed by the City of Alma since the 1960s. The park is best known for bald eagle watching looking from the park out across the Mississippi River to the sand island where there is an active bald eagle nest. The bald eagles often visit the park, roosting in the overhead tree canopy. This park is identified as an asset in the Buffalo County Outdoor Recreation Plan (2016-2020).

UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER NATIONAL WILDLIFE & FISH REFUGE

The entire western border of the City of Alma, Wisconsin runs concurrent with the Upper Mississippi National Wildlife & Fish Refuge (Pools 4 & 5). This includes the Mississippi River shoreline and Mississippi backwater areas. In addition, Rieck’s Lake and the confluence of the Mississippi River and the Buffalo River are part of this area, both are located within the limits of the City of Alma.

The Refuge was established in 1924 as a refuge for fish, wildlife and plants and a breeding place for migratory birds. The refuge encompasses one of the largest blocks of floodplain habitat in the lower 48 states. Bordered by steep wooded bluffs that rise 550 feet above the river valley, the Mississippi River corridor and refuge offer scenic beauty and productive fish and wildlife habitat unmatched in the heart of America. The Refuge is an important component of The Mississippi Flyway and the City of Alma, Wisconsin is located directly on the Flyway.

WISCONSIN GREAT RIVER ROAD NATIONAL SCENIC BYWAY

Wisconsin State Highway 35 is Alma, Wisconsin’s Main Street and is designated a National Scenic Byway and a Wisconsin State Scenic Byway. Known as the Wisconsin Great River Road it promotes six intrinsic qualities:  recreation, culture, archaeology, scenery & nature. Wisconsin has actively participated in the establishment of this parkway since 1939 when the Legislature enacted the enabling act, 84.105 of the state statutes.

In the early 1950s, Wisconsin initiated the nation's first major state-supported program to acquire conservation easements when it began to purchase scenic easements on land along the highways adjacent to the Mississippi River, the Great River Road. This program became an early model for other conservation easement acquisition programs in the nation and included the City of Alma, Wisconsin.

National Scenic Byway designations recognize roads that exhibit one of six core intrinsic qualities – scenic, natural, historic, recreational, archaeological or cultural – contributing toward a unique travel experience and destination like Alma, Wisconsin. The Wisconsin Great River Road exhibits all six qualities … especially natural. The Byway is required to demonstrate strong community support and the City of Alma is required to develop a corridor management plan that preserves, protects and improves these qualities through a scenic easement. The goal of scenic protection overlaps with conversation goals such as protection of open space, wildlife habitat, forests and wetlands.  

There is an effort to encourage all 33 river town communities located on the Wisconsin Great River Road National Scenic Byway to become Bird City communities. They currently include Trempealeau, La Crosse, De Soto, Ferryville, and Prairie du Chien.

WISCONSIN STATE SCENIC BYWAY

In 1999 the State of Wisconsin established the Wisconsin Scenic Byway program. It is a cooperative effort between local communities and the Wisconsin Department of Transportation to identify and promote state highway corridors with scenic and/or historical attributes that provide travelers an enjoyable visual, educational and recreational experience. Wisconsin State Highway 35 (Main Street, Alma, Wisconsin) was designated as Wisconsin’s first state Scenic Byway in 2000 in cooperation with the City of Alma, Wisconsin. Through the use of scenic easements the preservation of the natural beauty, wildlife habitat, forests and wetlands along this roadside are preserved. The scenic easement program in Wisconsin started with, and is centered on, the Great River Road. Most scenic easements include an area 350 feet in depth along either side of a route within an area where it is deemed important to preserve certain scenic qualities and natural habitat.

G. Document that there is a segment of the Great Wisconsin Birding and Nature Trail or a designated Important Bird Area within or adjacent to your community.

GREAT WISCONSIN BIRDING & NATURE TRAIL (Mississippi/Chippewa Rivers Region)

Please refer to Pages 8, 9 & 10 of this publication. Both city parks (Buena Vista Park & Rieck’s Lake Park) are included in the recognized birding assets in this Wisconsin state publication.

WISCONSIN IMPORTANT BIRD AREA

As part of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife & Fish Refuge, the Mississippi River shoreline in Alma, Wisconsin is part of this designated area.

WETLAND OF INTERNATIONAL IMPORTANCE / GLOBALLY IMPORTANT BIRD AREA

In 2010 the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife & Fish Refuge was designated as a Wetland of International Importance by RAMSAR and a Globally Important Bird Area. As part of the Refuge, the Mississippi River shoreline in Alma, Wisconsin is part of this designated area.

H. Show that the local Chamber of Commerce or a similar group (e.g., an Audubon chapter, Wild Ones, etc.) takes an active role in the planning process for protecting and enlarging favorable bird habitat.

Both the Alma Area Chamber of Commerce and the Wings Over Alma Nature & Art Center have taken strides to promote & protect favorable bird habitat through social media & website information. These long-standing community organizations are important to the role of educating the public and promoting our abundant natural surroundings and opportunities for viewing and appreciating wildlife.

The Chamber’s Visitor Center is hosted at the Wings Over Alma Nature Center on Main Street and visitors to the area are immediately immersed in the importance of our area from a nature perspective. Information is available on activities, events and resources for birding.

Wings Over Alma Nature & Art Center provides the community and visitors with a view of the Mississippi River, backwater islands, Lock & Dam #4 and the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife & Fish Refuge. In addition they sponsor a monthly nature talk on various subjects that inform our citizens and visitors to our community on the importance of our abundant natural surroundings and birding opportunities. They are especially known for Bald Eagle viewing during the winter months.

A National Scenic Byway (NSB) Project at Rieck’s Lake Park provides multiple viewing decks with scopes and programs to promote the important role our area holds in the spring and fall migration along the Mississippi Flyway. Working with the NSB, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife & Fish Refuge and Wisconsin DNR, the City of Alma, Wisconsin completed this project with several Interpretive Panels providing information to visitors. The small city campground at Rieck’s Lake Park is overflowing during spring & fall migration months with bird watchers.

Community Forest Management

B. Implement a municipal moratorium on the trimming of trees and shrubs and the mowing of ditches, storm water retention basins, and other grasslands from May 15 to July 15 to prevent the destruction of active bird nests. (Exceptions: Invasive species control and public safety)

CITY OF ALMA PARKS & HIKING TRAILS

Trees were reported to have been sparse on the bluffs during Alma's 19th century development, partly because the Indians were reputed to set the slopes on fire each year to encourage the growth of grasses favored by wild game. Also, woodcutters employed in gathering fuel for steamboats in the town's early years cut what trees they could find close at hand. It was not until the 1880's that the familiar wooded slopes began to show in period photographs. Today this change has resulted in a profuse growth of trees on Alma’s bluff faces.

The City sponsors four areas where birding activities and preservation of community forest are managed. All of these parks and trails are actively managed by the City of Alma.

  • BUENA VISTA PARK, OVERLOOK & HIKING TRAIL: Buena Vista Park was presented to the City of Alma by the Ganz/McClyman family and has been actively managed by the City of Alma since the 1930s. The city is responsible for all forest management in the park and along the trail. This park & trail are identified as an asset in the Buffalo County Outdoor Recreation Plan (2016-2020).
  • MOSSY HOLLOW TRAILS: Mossy Hollow’s three hiking trails have been actively managed by the City of Alma since 1997. The city is responsible for all forest management and maintains the hiking trails. Recently Dairyland Power assisted by clearing out the area below their power line run for improved access to the acreage of Mossy Hollow. This trail is identified as an asset in the Buffalo County Outdoor Recreation Plan (2016-2020).
  • RIECK'S LAKE STATE PARK, VIEWING AREA & CAMPGROUND: This park has been actively managed by the City of Alma since the early 1930s. The city is responsible for all forest management at Rieck’s Lake Park. Several trees in this park have been inventoried and identified with a plaque for visitor education. This park & trail are identified as an asset in the Buffalo County Outdoor Recreation Plan (2016-2020).
  • ALMA CITY MARINA & RECREATION COMPLEX: This park has been actively managed by the City of Alma since the 1960s. The City is responsible for all forest management within the park. This park is identified as an asset in the Buffalo County Outdoor Recreation Plan (2016-2020).

WISCONSIN WETLAND GEMS

As part of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife & Fish Refuge, the Mississippi River shoreline and its confluence with the Buffalo River in Alma, Wisconsin are designated as a Wisconsin Wetland Gem. The Mississippi River corridor’s complex structure of islands, braided channels, oxbows and sloughs includes protected floodplain forest and marshes. Wildlife habitat values are what this site is best known for. The Refuge protects a significant portion of the Mississippi Flyway, which is used during migration by 40% of waterfowl in the U.S. Other wildlife includes about 300 species of birds, 31 species of reptiles and 14 species of amphibians. The City of Alma is responsible for management of their city parks within this area, including forest management.

Limiting or Removing Threats to Birds

A. Describe your community’s educational program to control free-roaming cats and/or the manner in which you actively publicize the Cats Indoors! initiative.

The City of Alma Ordinance 97.01 does not allow free-roaming cats or dogs. In addition, the Alma Area Chamber of Commerce website provides a link to “Cat Indoors” by American Bird Conservancy as a tool for cat owners. This web link is shared annually on the Alma Facebook page as a public education outreach.

B. Demonstrate that your community provides property owners with information on how to protect birds from window strikes (e.g., online links, brochures).

The Alma Area Chamber of Commerce website provides a link to “why birds hit windows” through the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and how to distract them from this behavior. This web link is shared annually on the Alma Facebook page as a public education outreach.

Public Education

B. Provide web links or a community newsletter demonstrating that your community educates property owners on methods to create and enhance backyard habitat for birds.

The Alma Area Chamber of Commerce website provides a link to “how to create a bird friendly yard” through the Audubon Society and “backyard birding” through the US Fish & Wild Life Service, National Refuge System.

C. Demonstrate that your community is represented in at least one citizen science bird monitoring program (e.g., the Christmas Bird Count, Great Backyard Bird Count, Swift Night Out).

The Alma Area Chamber of Commerce website provides a link to several bird monitoring & bird count programs. This web links are shared annually on the Alma Facebook page as a public education outreach.

  • Great Backyard Bird Count
  • Christmas Bird Count
  • Swift Night Out

In addition, the Alma Area supports the efforts of the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, Minnesota (across the Mississippi River from Alma, Wisconsin) in two bird counts/surveys:

  • WEEKLY BALD EAGLE COUNTS DURING WINTER MIGRATION: Every week from November through April, citizens of the City of Alma participate in counting the bald eagle population present along the Mississippi River corridor in Alma, Wisconsin. Participants learn about favorite bald eagle habitat, feeding patterns, weather impacts, open water needs and food sources during the winter season. Count information is published weekly on our website and also shared with the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, Minnesota for publication in their Winter Bald Eagle Counts. During the 2016-2017 season, this count was taken every Monday for 21 weeks. Photographers are also out capturing great birding pictures that are shared through social media on the Chamber’s Facebook site and website. Pictures are also shared with Wings Over Alma for publication on their website.
  • GOLDEN EAGLE PROJECT l ANNUAL GOLDEN EAGLE SURVEY: Local citizens of the City of Alma participate with the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, Minnesota in the Golden Eagle Project and its impact on Western Wisconsin. There is an annual survey and we even participated in a golden eagle release in 2009 on the bluff above Alma, Wisconsin. Goal of the project is to learn more about golden eagles, their breeding origins, migration patterns, habitat needs & prey requirement in our local area. Conservation of critical habitats in the bluff lands regions is encouraged.

D. Describe your community-sponsored annual bird festival. This must be a multi-day event or a truly exceptional one-day event.

Eagles on Ice is held every January by the Wings over Alma Nature & Art Center and will be celebrating its 10th year in 2017. The Center was initially named for the Bald Eagles flying over Main Street Alma and this event celebrates their importance to our community. In the winter Bald Eagles are attracted by the open waters below Lock & Dam #4 and we have dozens of Bald Eagles who have migrated from Canada. Activities are held throughout the day as the Center builds awareness of the Bald Eagles wintering population.

Birding by Mini Train is held twice a year during spring and fall migration by the Wings Over Alma Nature & Art Center. It features birding guides and habitat for exploration by approximately 160 participants with migration activity taking place along The Mississippi Flyway. The event is held on a mini-train through the Tiffany Bottoms State Nature Area along the Chippewa River.

Great River Birding Month is a new event that will be held the entire month of May. Each storefront on Main Street in Alma, Wisconsin is adopting a migratory bird that they will feature. The Alma Area Chamber of Commerce will provide a Birding Information Sheet for each bird that will be displayed and available to visitors to Alma throughout the month. Big River Theatre is showing “Winged Migration”. 3G Gallery is hosting live music. Streets will be decorated with 20 bird house displays promoting Alma, Wisconsin as a stopover point for spring migration along the Mississippi Flyway. Additional events & activities are planned for this month-long community event as “Alma Goes to the Birds”. More event information can be found at http://almawisconsin.com/seasonsevents/almagoestothebirds.html

Great River Birding Festival is also a new event that will be held on the 13th of May as part of Great River Birding Month activities. International Migratory Bird Day has been recognized in prior years by posting information on our Facebook pages, but starting in 2017 there will be an actual day-long celebration.

Flyway Film Festival is held in October each year and Alma participates as one of their movie viewing sites. This is becoming a great opportunity to promote and educate participants about the Mississippi Flyway and fall migration. We intend to more closely associate the Mississippi Flyway and fall bird migration to the Flyway Film Festival in 2017.

E. Illustrate a program that involves schools, garden clubs, or other organizations in bird conservation activities.

Discover Wisconsin produced a program in 2010 called “Birding in Wisconsin”. Alma, Wisconsin was one of three Wisconsin “Birding Hot Spots” featured. Its purpose was to promote the importance of birding in Alma, Wisconsin (especially Bald Eagles) and the resources available to birding enthusiasts. This program is still actively promoted on the Alma Chamber website and by Discover Wisconsin. Volunteers from three community organizations (Alma Area Chamber of Commerce, Wings Over Alma Nature & Art Center and the City of Alma) sponsored this program, wrote and were filmed as part of the film’s narration and actively participated in its production.

Tundra Swan Watch is a citizen group that staffs the viewing deck at Rieck’s Lake Park in Alma, Wisconsin during the Tundra Swan migration season. Along with Wings Over Alma, they were important in obtaining the National Scenic Byway grant to design & build interpretive panels on bird migration as well as the two Rieck’s Lake Park Observation Decks. Once, as many as 6,000 tundra swans came to Rieck’s Lake but river sediment filled the slough, accelerated by floods, and their favorite tubers largely were replaced by burr reeds. Today there are a handful of tundra swans during spring and fall migration, there is little need for the volunteers to staff the viewing decks but you can still find them talking about migration along the Mississippi Flyway and the glory days of tundra swans in Alma, Wisconsin.

Peregrine Falcon Restoration Program, sponsored by Dairyland Power Cooperative and the Raptor Resource Project, has had wild success. Research on falcon activity in western Wisconsin revealed that the peregrine falcons migrated through the area but had not been successful in establishing nesting sites. It was noted that the raptors would visit the stacks at one of Dairyland’s power plants in Alma, Wisconsin. Located between high bluffs and the Mississippi River, the stacks were a perfect spot for falcons. In March of 1994 a nesting box was installed at a port 450 feet up the stack at the Alma Generating Station. The box was created by area high school students as a science project. In 1997 two birds nesting in the box produced three offspring, the first successful wild hatch of Peregrine Falcons in Western Wisconsin in 25 years. Today the program is considered one of the most successful of its kind because the falcons have moved from the nesting box on the stack and established natural nesting sites on the bluff sides above Alma, Wisconsin. This program has been part of the monthly Nature Talks at Wings Over Alma as a continuing education effort.

Enhance Alma is a volunteer organization that plans & implements projects and installs & maintains garden plantings throughout the City of Alma. Many of the street gardens and pocket-garden plantings include bird-friendly species. Sidewalk flower boxes are also planted each year and we’ve even seen hummingbirds frequently visiting these public planting spaces.

Alma Rod & Gun Club hosts an annual program on Buffalo County Prairie Management. All parties interested in prairie restoration and management are invited to attend to learn about or be updated on the status of the area’s prairie restoration. Discussion includes management techniques and highlight native plants, birds, animals, and insects that have been identified on the local prairie properties. Land owners participating in prairie restoration in Buffalo County have been part of the monthly Nature Talks at Wings Over Alma as a continuing education effort.

Buffalo County Land & Trails Trust, Inc. | Flyway Trail is a planned paved multi-use recreational trail project will run along the western shore of the Mississippi River in Buffalo County between the bridge to Winona MN and Nelson WI. This project began in 2014 and is expected to be completed within 10 years. Habitat and birding resources are an important component of this project.

  • The Great River Trails Program, initiated in the 1970s, includes the Winona to Nelson stretch as part of the Master Trail Plan. The Great River State Trail currently ends at Bluff Siding WI at the edge of the Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge.
  • A linking trail, the Great River State Trail Winona Connector Project, has recently been approved and work will soon begin connecting the Great River State Trail to a crossover point to Winona MN.
  • The Flyway Trail will start at this link point and continue to Nelson WI, passing directly through the City of Alma. Land acquisition is currently in process and construction will begin on the first trail section at Alma, WI over the next two years. Flyway Trail has opened an office at 111 Main Street, Alma, WI to build public awareness and for education purposes.

Shawnee Estates is a City of Alma development area offering a broad valley and bordering habitat within the city. Originally this area was zoned to promote housing development but only one house was ever built. The City of Alma owns this natural site and is considering options on future development including trails.

Wings Over Alma Nature & Art Center opened in 2007 and hosts 7,000-10,000 visitors annually. It's unusual for a Nature Center to be located within an urban area, right on Main Street. They are open daily. The Center offers an outdoor viewing deck overlooking the Mississippi River and is equipped with spotting scopes and binoculars to view a variety of wildlife year-round. The Mississippi Flyway brings thousands of migrating birds past the Center. During the winter months, hundreds of bald eagles can be viewed from the deck, feeding in the open water below Lock and Dam #4. Wings Over Alma overlooks the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife & Fish Refuge.

  • Wings Over Alma is home to the Senior Meal Program 4 days a week. Housing this program in a Nature Center allows senior citizen outreach and an opportunity to build awareness through their direct surroundings, monthly programs and opportunities to view birds with scopes from the observation deck overlooking the Mississippi River.
  • In January each year Wings Over Alma hosts Eagles on Ice providing a day of learning about the bald eagles in Alma and the migrating population that settle in for the winter from Canada. This is a great outreach program with strong community participation every year.
  • In April each year the Elementary School Classes from the Alma Area School visit Wings Over Alma. They learn about the Nature Center, learn how to view birds through the scopes from the viewing deck and are exposed to the importance of the birds in their backyard, Alma’s important habitat and migration along the Mississippi Flyway.
  • In the spring and the fall, Wings Over Alma hosts “Birding by Mini Train” and takes 50+ participants on a mini-train ride through Tiffany Bottoms State Natural Area. Volunteers from Wings Over Alma are available to help participants in spotting birds, offering information on the habitat in Tiffany Bottoms and pointing out birding “hot spots” along the route. Participants are led through 3 stop-off points to walk through prairies, riverside habitat and natural forest areas. Birding experts from the University of Minnesota, Wisconsin DNR staff and USFWS staff are included on these trips.
  • Since 2010, Wings Over Alma Nature & Art Center has offered a Monthly Nature Talk to the public. Birding Topics have included:
    • How To Build A Bluebird House
    • Backyard Birding (also included children’s participation in making a peanut butter log)
    • Bird Banding, A Useful Tool In Studying Birds (also included field work at Rieck’s Lake Park)
    • Raptors From The Area (live bird presentation with a falcon, an osprey and a bald eagle)
    • Bald Eagle Visitation from the National Eagle Center (with a live bald eagle)
    • Night Time Bat Walk: Discovering Alma’s Bat Population
    • Tundra Swans & Their Migration Through Alma
    • Mill Creek Road: Discover The Birds Hiking From Buena Vista To Mill Creek
    • Discover Wisconsin: Birding Hot Spot In Alma, Wisconsin
    • Birding By Paddle, Swifts Under The Bridges (a canoe/kayak trip under the Buffalo River bridge and through Beef Slough)
    • Buena Vista Trail: Hiking From The Bluff To Main Street
    • Peregrine Falcons Nesting On The Dairyland Stack, Now On The Bluffs
    • Alma Is A Stopover On The Mississippi Flyway
    • Winter Bird Feeding: Feeders, Eating Habits & What To Feed
    • How To Photograph Birds
    • Watching Warblers In Mossy Hollow
    • Bluff Prairies: Native Habitat Restoration In Western Wisconsin
    • What’s Nesting in Your Backyard?
    • Bird City Wisconsin: Why Participation Is Important
    • Flyway Trail: Multi-Use Recreational Trail Coming To Buffalo County

International Migratory Bird Day (IMBD)

A. This community's municipal body passed the required International Migratory Bird Day resolution.

B. Document and describe your event that incorporates the annual IMBD theme in some fashion. If the event has not yet occurred, please share your detailed plans. For information on the current year’s theme and event materials, please visit the International Migratory Bird Day website. To see what other Bird City communities have done in the past, please view some other profiles on our website.

The City of Alma Resolution 17-02 recognizing International Migratory Bird Day was officially adopted by motion with a passing vote by the Common Council of the City of Alma on January 9, 2017.

Alma celebrated International Migratory Bird Day the entire month of May with a special event on Saturday, May 13, 2017.

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Community Details

Joined Bird City: 2017

Population: 781

Incorporated: 1885

Area: 7.91 mi2

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