Village of Trempealeau

Village of Trempealeau

Habitat Creation, Protection, and Monitoring

B. Describe organized bird monitoring or data obtained from researchers or volunteers in the local park system. (Exclusions: Programs that receive credit under 4C: Christmas Bird Count, Great Backyard Bird Count, Swift Night Out)

The Village of Trempealeau maintains an active partnership with Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge. The Village recognizes and promotes monitoring activities in the refuge through both Village and Chamber of Commerce websites. In turn, those seeking information are able to access educational links regarding laws, habitat, protection, education and much more. The Village of Trempealeau has plans in progress to provide additional bird conservation activities with the help of the national wildlife refuge nearby.

C. Provide evidence (e.g., official designation of natural areas, easements, etc.) that existing bird habitat within community limits has legal protection. (Exclusions: Leash laws; prohibitions against disturbing nests and wildlife; areas consisting primarily of mowed grass)

Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge exists to serve as a refuge and breeding ground for migratory birds and other wildlife. To protect bird habitat, dogs must be on a leash shorter than six feet, and unconfined domestic animals like cats, livestock, and exotic pets are prohibited. Entering within a 100-meter radius of an active bald eagle nest is prohibited from February 1 to July 1. Additionally, the cutting, removing, or damaging of any tree or vegetation for any reason is prohibited on the refuge. Another rule to limit disturbance of wildlife includes requiring a special use permit from the refuge manager for large group activities. There are also hunting regulations that protect migratory birds and other game species from illegal take and preserve legitimate hunting opportunities. An expanded list of additional rules and policies can be found here

F. Show that your community offers the public information on how they can control and remove invasive species in order to improve or maintain bird habitat.

While birds can often digest the seeds and fruits of invasive plants, they typically provide much lower nutritional value when compared to native plants.

Some actions you can take to control the spread of invasives include cleaning your boots, clothes, and binoculars after you enter and leave an area to prevent the spread of invasive seeds. Also check your vehicle and boat for hitchhiking seeds and vegetation before entering and leaving a natural area. Another action is to choose native plants for landscaping projects. More actions can be found here on the Fish and Wildlife Service website.

The most effective method for removing invasive species depends on the specific species and should be researched before acting. Otherwise, some common ways to remove invasive plants include hand pulling, biological control, or herbicide. Other ways can be found on the WIDNR website here.

G. Document that there is a segment of the Great Wisconsin Birding and Nature Trail or a designated Important Bird Area within or adjacent to your community.

The Village of Trempealeau has four areas listed in the Great Wisconsin Birding and Nature Trail Guide within and around the village limits. These areas are: the Great River State Trail, Perrot State Park, Trempealeau Lakes State Wildlife Area and Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge. The vast majority of these areas are heavily forested bluffs and ravines located along the Mississippi River and cover more than 5,000 acres. This habitat allows visitors to observe many species from Bald Eagles and Black Terns to Grasshopper Sparrows and Orchard Orioles. The mix of elevation, marshes and grasslands within the forests allow many opportunities for any birding enthusiast.

H. Show that the local Chamber of Commerce or a similar group (e.g., an Audubon chapter, Wild Ones, etc.) takes an active role in the planning process for protecting and enlarging favorable bird habitat.

The Friends of Trempealeau Refuge is comprised of local village residents. Each year, the Friends actively support the refuge's bird festival as well as other educational events.

Community Forest Management

F. OTHER: Demonstrate in a narrative.

Trempealeau County implements forest planning guidelines within its codes and ordinances. The Trempealeau Chamber and local elementary school work with Perrot State Park and Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge in a joint effort conforming to the county’s forest management regulations. Also, the Mississippi Valley Conservancy has a technical committee member of the Wisconsin Mississippi River Parkway Commission. In addition, the Village of Trempealeau partners with other organizations for the Arbor Day celebration in Trempealeau.

Limiting or Removing Threats to Birds

A. Describe your community’s educational program to control free-roaming cats and/or the manner in which you actively publicize the Cats Indoors! initiative.

2.4 billion birds are killed by outdoor cats every year. This is not limited to stray or feral cats, as well-fed house cats will also hunt and kill birds. Unfortunately, even the presence of house cats is shown to have negative health impacts on nesting birds as they view them as a predator.

Therefore, please consider joining other responsible pet owners who have signed the pledge to keep cats indoors, on a leash, or in an enclosure.

The Village of Trempealeau has links to learn more about bird safety from the American Bird Conservancy.

American Bird Conservancy - Cat's Indoors    

American Bird Conservancy - Bird Collisions Threats/Prevention

https://abcbirds.org/threat/cats-and-other-invasives/

B. Demonstrate that your community provides property owners with information on how to protect birds from window strikes (e.g., online links, brochures).

The Village of Trempealeau has links from the American BIrd Conservancy giving information on how to protect birds from window strikes. 

https://www.fws.gov/library/collections/threats-birds-collisions

https://www.audubon.org/news/reducing-collisions-glass

https://nationalaudubon.app.box.com/s/si7w7muxddxlmy2d3rnmhszc2zza0527

Public Education

A. Demonstrate that schools in your community participate in a nationally-recognized environmental education program (e.g., Flying WILD, Audubon Adventures) or that your community organizes its own substantial education and outreach program for young people. 

Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge has taken a very active role in providing educational materials, programs, festivals, and activities for area schools, organizations, and area visitors. Each year the refuge invites area schools to utilize their learning center classroom and environmental education materials. As the lead agency in conservation, education programs emphasize the role conservation and provide information to all grade levels. Students receive programs about conservation, bird ecology and much more. For the past 18 years, the refuge has coordinated a region-wide environmental education event called River Education Days which has brought close to 18,000 students (Fifth Grade students) out to the refuge for a day of programs directed related to conservation. Trempealeau Elementary students have participated in this conservation event since it began in 2002.   Program titles include: Invasive Species, Bird Migration, Basic Birding, Bird Banding demonstrations, Mammals of the Upper Mississippi River, and much, much more. Through the refuge, we are instilling a sense of wonder, land stewardship, and pride of the rich resources surrounding the Village of Trempealeau through our area residents and their children.

B. Provide web links or a community newsletter demonstrating that your community educates property owners on methods to create and enhance backyard habitat for birds.

Trempealeau residents can plant native wildflowers, grasses, trees, and shrubs on their properties to improve habitat for birds. Trees such as cherries, mulberries, and birches provide fruits and seeds that are favorite foods among native birds. Additionally, trees such as cedars, hackberries, and hawthorns bear fruit in winter when sources of nutrition are limited for birds that remain in the area during the colder months. Planting evergreen trees will also provide birds with shelter from winter storms when other trees have lost their leaves.

Consider leaving dead trees standing on your property as long as they don’t pose a safety hazard to humans or buildings. Dead trees provide birds with places to nest and take shelter, and often contain insects that birds such as woodpeckers can consume. Also consider planting native wildflowers, as they provide food for hummingbirds, as well as insects that can serve as food for other birds.

The Village of Trempealeau has links to help residents enhance their backyard habitat for birds.

How to create a bird friendly yard      Creating a Bird-Friendly Yard with Native Wisconsin Plants

C. Demonstrate that your community is represented in at least one citizen science bird monitoring program (e.g., the Christmas Bird Count, Great Backyard Bird Count, Swift Night Out).

Each year community members from the Village of Trempealeau participate in the annual Christmas Bird Count. The village has an Audubon event coordinator that coordinates, collect and disperse all collection locations, maps, and data which is submitted for the annual CBC. The bird count data expands to the refuge and participants collect data from the entire area illustrating the strong connection between the community and the refuge and bird conservation.

D. Describe your community-sponsored annual bird festival. This must be a multi-day event or a truly exceptional one-day event.

Each May, the Village of Trempealeau celebrates World Migratory Bird Day with a relevant theme at the Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge. The first day of the festival includes a keynote speaker addressing bird conservation. The second day includes multiple guided bird hikes, a prairie wildflower walk, a program for young birders, a presentation with live birds, and bird banding demonstrations. The refuge continually updates their website and Facebook pages to keep information available to area visitors about upcoming bird education events. These social media updates are shared with the Village which in turn updates their social media formats as well. Current refuge website information can be found online at Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge,  Friends of Trempealeau and Facebook.

E. Illustrate a program that involves schools, garden clubs, or other organizations in bird conservation activities.

Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge has taken a very active role in providing educational materials, programs, festivals, and activities for area schools, organizations and visitors about conservation and bird ecology.

Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge has taken a very active role in providing educational materials, programs, festivals, and activities for area schools, organizations, and area visitors. Each year the refuge invites area schools to utilize their learning center classroom and environmental education materials. As the lead agency in conservation, education programs emphasize the role conservation and provide information to all grade levels. Students receive programs about conservation, bird ecology and much more. For the past 18 years, the refuge has coordinated a region-wide environmental education event called River Education Days which has brought close to 18,000 students (Fifth Grade students) out to the refuge for a day of programs directed related to conservation. Trempealeau Elementary students have participated in this conservation event since it began in 2002.   Program titles include: Invasive Species, Bird Migration, Basic Birding, Bird Banding demonstrations, Mammals of the Upper Mississippi River, and much, much more. Through the refuge, we are instilling a sense of wonder, land stewardship, and pride of the rich resources surrounding the Village of Trempealeau through our area residents and their children.

World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD)

A. This community's municipal body passed the required World Migratory Bird Day resolution.

B. Document and describe your event that incorporates the annual IMBD theme in some fashion. If the event has not yet occurred, please share your detailed plans. For information on the current year’s theme and event materials, please visit the World Migratory Bird Day website. To see what other Bird City communities have done in the past, please view some other profiles on our website.

The Village of Trempealeau’s 2023 World Migratory Bird Day event was held at Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday May 15th from 7:30AM to 12:30PM. This was a family-friendly event held by refuge staff and volunteers. Activities consisted of seven separate birding hikes around the refuge, a beginner bird hike for kids ages 4-12, bird banding demonstrations, a DIY bird feeder workshop, a “Bird’s Eye View” presentation, and a 2023 Junior Duck Stamp exhibition. River Valley Raptors was there as well to showcase some of their live raptors. Link to event page: https://www.fws.gov/event/world-migratory-bird-day-festival Photos from the event this year can be found on the refuge’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/TrempealeauNWR/posts/pfbid02qCtCvSYZaBRzUknE6KfPFtTL2X1N1JaPqwXmq44vA7HBt8RKLYZRApsAstT4T9UMl

Joined Bird City: 2011

Population: 1,529

Incorporated: 1867

Area: 2.1 mi2

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